Purr Cat Food Review

2
Purr Cat Food Review
Country of originAustralia
Available fromColes

This terrible excuse for dry cat food is marketed as gourmet, which is surely a joke as it’s far from gourmet. In our Purr cat food review you may need to take a seat and brace yourself, especially if you’ve been feeding this to your poor cat.

Purr cat food review

What the marketing says

Purr Cat Food Review

The packet of Purr cat food states “Spoil your feline friend with a wide selection of flavours, a delicious meal they’ll be sure to love”. Feeding your carnivorous meat-eating pet cat cereal grains, one of the main ingredients of Purr, even at a fundamental doesn’t sound like something your cat will be sure to love.

Using the word gourmet on the front of the bag doesn’t say much either, and is purely a marketing word to dupe you into thinking you’re feeding your cat something fancy. I remember seeing a kebab van once with “Gourmet Kebabs” in big bold letters and I debated whether the greasy spinning meat was in fact gourmet.

The chicken breast and piece of fish on the front of the bag aren’t representative of what the product is actually made of either, as the first two ingredients of Purr cat food are ambiguous poultry and fish meals which could be any (sub)standard leftovers of those groups of animal.

What the labelling really says

Poultry meal, fish meal, and wholegrain cereals (wheat and/or sorghum) don’t scream quality when it comes to cat foods, but they’re the three main ingredients. Wheat is one of the most problematic grains we feed dogs and cats, and often results in weight gain, itchy skin, and likely a precursor to all manner of illnesses which will cost you $$$$s to try and rectify at the vets. Cats are obligate carnivores and shouldn’t have grains in their diet whatsoever, especially problematic grains like wheat. We also find tapioca as the 6th ingredient, which combined with the cereal grains serve to keep production costs down, not offer nutrition.

Ambiguous meal ingredients are often a tell-tale sign of cheap inclusions, and often the stuff that gets thrown out of a factory which takes the prime “gourmet” cuts to sell to us humans. The same applies to poultry oil as yet another ambiguous ingredient. Salmon oil further down the ingredients is the better inclusion, but likely in a small amount.

There are a few positives about Purr cat food which are worth mentioning. Flaxseeds are good for heart health and wellbeing, and there’s a natural prebiotic in there in some small amount (and again we find this to be completely ambiguous and we have to question the quality).

Purr cat food is preserved naturally rather than potentially carcinogenic chemicals, so that’s possibly the most positive aspect of the product.

Sadly it’s not the worst cat food on the supermarket shelves, but it’s still not a gourmet meal for the cat who depends on you to feed him or her. If you want something better, these are our best rated cat foods in Australia.

Meow 😞

Where to buy Purr cat food

Purr cat food is available in Coles.

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Purr cat food ingredients

Ingredients of Purr dry cat food (Chicken & Ocean Fish) as of June 2021:

Poultry Meal, Fish Meal, Wholegrain Cereals (Wheat and/or Sorghum), Poultry Oil, Tapioca, Beet Pulp, Salmon Oil, Flax Seeds, Salt, Natural Prebiotic, Yucca Schidigera, Taurine, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Vitamins and Minerals, Lutein, Carrots, Blueberries, Cranberries, Garlic, Kelp.

Purr cat food guaranteed analysis

Guaranteed analysis of Purr dry cat food (Chicken & Ocean Fish) as of June 2021:

Protein30%
Fat14%
Crude Fibre3%
Carbohydrates *38% (estimated)
* May be estimated. Read how to calculate carbohydrates in a pet food.

Recalls of Purr cat food

There are no known recalls at the current time.

4.2 Total Score
Not very "gourmet"

CONS
  • Cereal grains (wheat and/or sorghum)
  • Ambiguous ingredients are often poor quality